Kyle Pettit

The lesson I learned at the Apple Store

Kyle Pettit
The lesson I learned at the Apple Store

 

So yesterday after a long, hot, annoying day at work, I pulled my phone out of my pocket and found out that at some point during the day I had broke it. Not just cracked the screen but also screen-gone-completely-white, broken.

I was mad. Like more mad than I probably should have. It could have been the collection of a lot of things, like wrecking my car the week before and some things that didn’t go the way I wanted them to during the week. After calming down a little bit (by venting to myself in my rental car) I took to the Apple store. Which only added to my frustration, the soonest they could see me was a 2 hour wait. Which feels like 8 hours without a phone to check Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and then repet that cycle. So I was stuck with my thoughts. As the waiting progressed I calmed done and finally a brown hair guy about my age named Adrian came and took me to the genius bar. As he diagnosed my phone, (said “yup the screen is broken..”) we began to talk.

I was just asking question about him and his life, whether he liked working at the Apple store or not. And he said he liked it but after working here he sees how entitled people are. How a broken phone is the end of the world. A shot straight to me as a sat listening. The words that pierced me worse was “If the biggest problem we have is a broken phone we have it pretty good.” They were hard works to hear but such a good wake up call reminder.

 

Its really easy to get sucked into the “first world problem” mentality. A broken phone, or car. A cold latte, or a hot day can ruin our day. While they might be hard or annoying, they still are trivial things. Our time should be spent far more say thanks for everything we have, like a phone to be broken, or coffee at all, rather than complaining about it not being perfect. We all know there are people around the world that have it much worse than us. So why complain?

 

In the book of James Ch. 4 it says, “What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes.” How true is this! Our lives are short. We aren’t guaranteed the next second of the day, so why spend our short lives complaining about trivial pursuits that we wont even remember in eternity. Surely God intended my life to be more than me getting mad at my broken screen. Let us focus our lives on the things that matter the things eternal.

 

“Life Is Short. Eternity Is Long. Live Like It.” (John Piper)

 

Living knowing that your life is a vapor is different than just living. Things here are passing away. You’ve got to hold on to what will stand. Savor what matters.